See the top rated post in this thread. Click here

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30

Thread: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

  1. #1
    All AUGI, all the time zoomharis's Avatar
    Join Date
    2005-02
    Location
    Abu Dhabi (Native-India)
    Posts
    506
    1 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    Hi all,
    If you are the responsible guy for absorbing people in for your company, on what basis you select them? Let's say, in case of a draftsman, do you prefer his knowledge in the CAD softwares to his technical subject knowlege (Like Electrical, Civil, Mechanical) etc.? I have seen so many people being absorbed into companies without knowing the ABCs of computer aided drafting. Moreover whenever you attend an interview as a CAD draftsman, most often you are supposed to design and draft something as per the interviewer's suggestion (May be for the first and last time) and the skills you have aquired in drafting is of little use if you are not well aware of the subject. So what is the future of CAD addicts who spend a lot of time in enriching their own CAD skills...? Are they simply wasting time...?

    Thanks
    har!s
    Last edited by zoomharis; 2006-06-04 at 04:43 PM. Reason: To correct grammar mistake
    har!s
    CADing && Coding
    AuotCAD 2010 on Windows XP Professional (SP3)

  2. #2
    Certified AUGI Addict jaberwok's Avatar
    Join Date
    2000-12
    Location
    0,0,0 The Origin
    Posts
    8,371
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    To be a draughtsman, as opposed to a tracer or operator, implies subject knowledge - doesn't it?
    John B

    "You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep-seated need to believe." - Carl Sagan

  3. #3
    All AUGI, all the time zoomharis's Avatar
    Join Date
    2005-02
    Location
    Abu Dhabi (Native-India)
    Posts
    506
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    Quote Originally Posted by jaberwok
    To be a draughtsman, as opposed to a tracer or operator, implies subject knowledge - doesn't it?
    Ofcourse, subject knowledge is required. But considering the amount of time we spend expanding the software knowledge, as opposed to the subject knowledge, it seems less worthy as per the situation mentioned above. Shouldn't we spend more time on expanding the subject knowledge rather than spending it on the software knowledge? (By the way, I personally don't like to spend more time on subject related things. My interest lies in the software arena)

    har!s
    har!s
    CADing && Coding
    AuotCAD 2010 on Windows XP Professional (SP3)

  4. #4
    AUGI Addict Brian Myers's Avatar
    Join Date
    2003-02
    Location
    St Louis, Missouri
    Posts
    1,701
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    Quote Originally Posted by zoomharis
    Let's say, in case of a draftsman, do you prefer his knowledge in the CAD softwares to his technical subject knowlege (Like Electrical, Civil, Mechanical) etc.? So what is the future of CAD addicts who spend a lot of time in enriching their own CAD skills...? Are they simply wasting time...?
    There was a time where being a "CAD addict" was enough, then over time it became obvious there were too many "CAD addicts" without technical skills. So principles began to look for technical people and then teach them the "CAD Skills". For the future, its important to realize that the software will be more and more usable and the employees entering the workforce will be more likely to have skills in the associated software. As a result, the people with the most technical knowledge will be the most in demand, especially once many firms slim down a bit due to the production benefits of software and data interoperability.

    You are not wasting your time to enrich your CAD skills! It's very important to be productive and if you are more productive than the next guy then your worth is that much more for the company. But, its very likely that you are not focusing on the most important area if you don't already have a grasp on your field of choice.

    Myself, I am a "CAD addict" and a few months ago I took a job training, teaching CAD. Yet I hope it leads to a more extensive career in teaching; an inside track to the emerging field of using technology in project management; expertise in using technology for property management. So now I'm learning the technology and about a year from now (once I've gotten the technology semi-mastered) I plan on studying/gaining experience in the business management end of things. Personally I'm not sure where that takes my career (I know I'll be in this industry for a good length of time) but when they day comes to move on I'll have a wide range of experience both professionally and technically... which is ultimately important. So it IS important to have good CAD skills, but its more important to understand your industry so you can utilize those skills and that you are fine-tuning your skills for that future.
    Brian Myers
    MEP Technology Director for Leidos

  5. #5
    Certified AUGI Addict jaberwok's Avatar
    Join Date
    2000-12
    Location
    0,0,0 The Origin
    Posts
    8,371
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    I think this subject runs parallel to the subject of IT in schools. For a few years it was thought important that all school leavers had programming ability - or, at least, programming knowledge. After this period it was realised (I think) that most school leavers didn't need this at all. All they really needed was to be able to use Word, Excel, Access, etc.. That is, the pc is just another tool like a pen or a reference library.

    That's not very well put, I know.
    John B

    "You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep-seated need to believe." - Carl Sagan

  6. #6
    Member redWORKX's Avatar
    Join Date
    2003-09
    Location
    Dallas / Fot Worth Area, Texas
    Posts
    21
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    There will always be a place for designers and draftsmen and the skill sets which they bring to the table, however it really depends on your career focus as to what is important. If you want a career in cadd applications then concentrating on a particular set of technical skills outside of the application may not all that important. If you want a career in civil engineering (example only) as a draftsmen, then technical knowledge of the subject will be more important than your individual software abilities because it's that knowledge which will ultimately advance your career.

    A cadd application is nothing more than a tool to which we use to relate our vision of the object we are creating; whether that is a building or a machined part. Just as every plumber must know how to use his wrench, and should keep up with new wrench technology, ultimately it isn't the wrench which gets the job done, it's the plumber's use of the wrench.
    redWORKX Design Inc.
    Your AEC Technology Partner

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    2001-11
    Posts
    33
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Wink Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    I think redWORKX makes a really good point on this subject and I agree with him. Though the use of CAD is important, it is more important to have knowledge of the subject matter. If you had two people, one with good working knowledge of CAD, but no practical knowledge of the subject matter. Then you have another guy who is a novice CAD user but has good knowledge of the subject matter, which would you choose.

    Me, I would take the second guy. It has been my experience that it is easier to teach some one CAD then to teach them the nuances of drafting in my Field of work. The subject matter is more complicated and sometimes harder to teach. Using the program is more straight forward and easier to teach. This has been my experience.

  8. #8
    ATP Manager CADKitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    2004-09
    Location
    The Dragon's Lair
    Posts
    730
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    I think it depends on the field and the software. Speaking as someone who was job looking six months ago, the interviewers all wanted to know about my CAD expertise. As they were looking for draftsmen, they were more concerned about my knowledge of the software and all offered on-the-job training for the specifics of the field. That being said, seeing as I am more comfortable in the MEP field (mechanical, electrical, plumbing) when I came upon a place looking for civil drafters, I respectfully declined. (Ok, so the pay would have stunk, too, but still...)

    Should a company be looking, however, for a designer then the knowledge of the software may not be as important to them, but it would certainly be a bonus.
    I drink coffee for your protection.

  9. #9
    AUGI Addict
    Join Date
    2005-07
    Posts
    2,356
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    An Architectural Degree takes min. 7years in the UK, A CAD course can take about a week (sometimes longer). And with both you only become profficient by actually using your technical or software knowledge in the real world, i.e. outside of a classroom..

    I think its easier to teach a person how to use a piece of software than it is to train them in there relevant field.

    I'm also a CADaholic, but whilst I thrive on learning extra tips tricks in CAD, the technical side has to come first.

    As an example I will give somebody in my office a project to work on, which will often be in the form hand drawn sketches (I design almost everything by hand first). A CAD drafter will generally simply digitise the original sketches and thats it, where as somebody with a bit of technical knowledge will likely put more thought into the building rather than what layers things are on - I think I'd take the guy who puts more thought into the building design itself every time.

    just my 2p

  10. #10
    All AUGI, all the time thomas.stright's Avatar
    Join Date
    2004-07
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    534
    0 Did you find this post helpful? Yes

    Default Re: Software Expertise vs. Technical Subject Knowledge

    We always go with Technical over Cad knowledge.

    I can teach the software fairly quickly, It's hard to teach the trade to someone who has never worked in it.
    Virtual Design Lead Coordinator
    The Brandt Compaines

    "Only the Skilled Survive" and having a CWP helps

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Another annoying undocumented subject
    By jgratton in forum AutoCAD General
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 2010-03-18, 06:37 PM
  2. C# expertise - how much?
    By winnwgomez in forum Revit - API
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 2008-05-13, 09:29 PM
  3. ADT Level of Expertise
    By mark.kiker in forum ACA General
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 2007-02-07, 06:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •