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Thread: Scaling in isometric View

  1. #1
    100 Club Binu Mathew's Avatar
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    Default Scaling in isometric View

    Good morning......... I have a doubt about isometric drawing preperation of piping.Is it possible to prepare in scale?that is angle and other dimensions in scale.Is it NTS or SCALED?normally it is NTS(not in scale)?please reply as soon as possible.Thanking you....

    With best regards,

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    Certified AUGI Addict jaberwok's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    The concept of scale doesn't really apply in isometric views because the x and y scales are always different.
    John B

    "You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep-seated need to believe." - Carl Sagan

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    Certifiable AUGI Addict tedg's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    Quote Originally Posted by BinuM View Post
    Good morning......... I have a doubt about isometric drawing preperation of piping.Is it possible to prepare in scale?that is angle and other dimensions in scale.Is it NTS or SCALED?normally it is NTS(not in scale)?please reply as soon as possible.Thanking you....

    With best regards,
    You can draw it with a scale in mind, but it wouldn't have a scale called out.
    You just want to avoid someone putting a scale on it to get dimensions.

    I've done some isometric drawings where lines were drawn and dimensioned at the correct length, but the scale was stated: "N.T.S."
    Ted
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    All AUGI, all the time Richard.Kent's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    Iso's can't be to scale since each line is foreshortened to the plane of projection. NTS is the only way to go.
    Last edited by Richard.Kent; 2008-08-27 at 10:27 PM. Reason: changed if to is

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    Administrator RobertB's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard.Kent View Post
    Iso's can't be to scale since each line is foreshortened to the plane of projection. NTS is the only way to go.
    Not entirely true. A 3D view set to one of the OOTB Iso (e.g. SW) can be scaled if you use a scale factor of 1.22474487*<desired scale>.
    R. Robert Bell
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    All AUGI, all the time Richard.Kent's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    The OP asked about an isometric drawing which is a 2D drawing, so my comment stands. Even still, calling a 3D iso view to scale still seems wrong to me.

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    Certified AUGI Addict jaberwok's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertB View Post
    Not entirely true. A 3D view set to one of the OOTB Iso (e.g. SW) can be scaled if you use a scale factor of 1.22474487*<desired scale>.
    x and y scales in the view plane will be different.
    John B

    "You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep-seated need to believe." - Carl Sagan

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    Certifiable AUGI Addict tedg's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard.Kent View Post
    Iso's can't be to scale since each line is foreshortened to the plane of projection. NTS is the only way to go.
    I agree and disagree.
    While I agree that you can't/shouldn't call out a scale for isometric drawings, you can draw them accurately and dimension them. The lines can be drawn to their actual length at their respective isometric angles. It makes the object appear a bit longer in those planes than it actually is, but can be done. This is actually discussed in a book I have from college, it's done to "simplify the drawing an Isometric view".

    See the enclosed drawing, I created this in the Isometric snap style.
    The lines are drawn and dimensioned to the correct lengths.
    I used a dimension style for plotting 1" = 1'-0", but I wouldn't state a "scale".

    ** The OP's question was (I'm paraphrasing) "Can Isometric drawings be prepared to a scale?"
    I say Yes you can draw them accurately (if needed) with a plotted scale in mind but you shouldn't call out a scale.

    But..if you're just doing a single-line (schematic) isometric drawing, it doesn't need to be done to any scale (1:1 ps is fine).

    That's all I'm sayin'
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by tedg; 2008-08-28 at 12:55 PM.
    Ted
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    Certifiable AUGI Addict dzatto's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertB View Post
    Not entirely true. A 3D view set to one of the OOTB Iso (e.g. SW) can be scaled if you use a scale factor of 1.22474487*<desired scale>.
    Well, techinially it can be dimensioned correctly in CAD using the scale factor, but it can't be scaled. In other words, when it's plotted, a sub can't put a scale on it to get a dimension in the field.
    Why is it called common sense when it is so rare?

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    Administrator RobertB's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scaling in isometric View

    Quote Originally Posted by dzatto View Post
    Well, techinially it can be dimensioned correctly in CAD using the scale factor, but it can't be scaled. In other words, when it's plotted, a sub can't put a scale on it to get a dimension in the field.
    Wrong. Plot the attached DWF file and place a scale on it. That DWF is of a single 3D box, 1×4×9.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    R. Robert Bell
    Design Technology Manager
    S P A R L I N G
    Opinions expressed are mine alone and do not reflect the views of Sparling.

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