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Thread: Research Lab!

  1. #1
    I could stop if I wanted to rbcameron1's Avatar
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    Default Research Lab!

    I love a couple days off to get back into the swing of things! I finished (soon to be finished) a biology lab and a research lab I've been meaning to do since my son was born!
    Finally!

    Comments welcome!

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    RB Cameron, AIA, LEED AP, EDAC
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    Mod / Salary / SM Wanderer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Research Lab!

    Quote Originally Posted by rbcameron1 View Post
    I love a couple days off to get back into the swing of things! I finished (soon to be finished) a biology lab and a research lab I've been meaning to do since my son was born!
    Finally!

    Comments welcome!

    Revit + 3dsMax: A Winning Combination
    The renderings look excellent and realistic... but, I actually have a question about those pipes... are those fume hoods of some sort, or something else?
    Melanie Stone
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  3. #3
    I could stop if I wanted to rbcameron1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Research Lab!

    For better or worse, the fume hoods are integral to the overhead rack family. The pipes are just a black pipe for gas and a copper line for what could be "N" "O" or even a CW line. They were modeled as sweeps but what I really need to do is parse out the whole revit rack family into its sub components, like the fume hood, control valves, rack supports and maybe even electrical into their individual families and make one nested family. This would ultimately prove more reliable and parameters could be assigned to "swap out" the different nested families for different lab support equipment. In this case a mini-fume hood for let's say...some sort of tool that is supported from the rack above. Or even a vacuum arm or an air compressor.

    The fume hoods are something unique I saw in a photograph of a lab in Missouri (or Kansas?) I only had two photos to go off of and I haven't researched who makes them. They just looked cool for this experimental rendering.
    RB Cameron, AIA, LEED AP, EDAC
    BIM Coordinator - VDC Coordinator - Visualization Artist
    Download Healthcare Revit+3dsMax Models
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  4. #4
    Mod / Salary / SM Wanderer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Research Lab!

    Quote Originally Posted by rbcameron1 View Post
    For better or worse, the fume hoods are integral to the overhead rack family. The pipes are just a black pipe for gas and a copper line for what could be "N" "O" or even a CW line. They were modeled as sweeps but what I really need to do is parse out the whole revit rack family into its sub components, like the fume hood, control valves, rack supports and maybe even electrical into their individual families and make one nested family. This would ultimately prove more reliable and parameters could be assigned to "swap out" the different nested families for different lab support equipment. In this case a mini-fume hood for let's say...some sort of tool that is supported from the rack above. Or even a vacuum arm or an air compressor.

    The fume hoods are something unique I saw in a photograph of a lab in Missouri (or Kansas?) I only had two photos to go off of and I haven't researched who makes them. They just looked cool for this experimental rendering.
    I definitely agree they look good.
    The fume hoods I saw in my old facility were always up against a wall, worked into some cabinetry. This feels much more modern and less restrictive.
    But, of course, the mechanical person in me is curious about how they might differ from the ones I'm used to.
    Melanie Stone
    @MistresDorkness

    ARCHIBUS, FMS/FMInteract and AutoCAD Expert (I use Revit, too)
    Technical Editor
    not all those who wander are lost

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