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Thread: Best Practices for Templates and Scaling

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    Default Best Practices for Templates and Scaling

    Hi All,
    I am writing to get advice from you experts in recent versions of AutoCad. I used to manage CAD standards back in 2007-2013 but we were using version 2004 AutoCad. I used to have everything set up per scale for instance, I had Dims for 192scale, 96scale, 48scale and so on. as well as custom linetypes. Is this the way everyone is doing it these days? what is best practice nowdays? The company I work for now does not really have any defined standards and we desperately need to set some up but I was out of AutoCad and into Creo for about six years so I feel kind of out of sync with these things now and I don't know if the way i used to do it is best practice these days? "Help" and Thank you!

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    Default Re: Best Practices for Templates and Scaling

    dimensions -- I use one style, and switch between annotative, and setting dimscale to zero. (no point in annotative unless you want to show the same dimension in more than one viewport --- not the best drafting practice, but gotta keep reviewers happy.)

    custom linetypes are often needed, but can be a pain if you need to share drawings with others, especially with unique .shx files.

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    Default Re: Best Practices for Templates and Scaling

    Thank you for that information, helpful.

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    Default Re: Best Practices for Templates and Scaling

    annotative is the way to go. One set up for text and dims, and you no longer have to work about scaling up or down.

    Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions.

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    Default Re: Best Practices for Templates and Scaling

    Not me, all annotative. Fast , simple, and that makes the boss happy.

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    Default Re: Best Practices for Templates and Scaling

    I'm happy to offer some advice on CAD standards in recent versions of AutoCAD.

    The way you used to do it, with separate dimension and linetype styles for different scales, is still a valid approach. However, there are now a few other things you can do to make your drawings more consistent and easier to manage.

    One option is to use named objects. Named objects are objects that have been given a unique name, such as a layer, text style, dimension style, or linetype. By using named objects, you can easily apply the same settings to multiple objects in a drawing.

    For example, you could create a named object called "Dim Style - 192 Scale" with the appropriate dimension settings for that scale. Then, whenever you need to add a dimension to a drawing at 192 scale, you can simply select the "Dim Style - 192 Scale" named object.

    Another option is to use drawing templates. Drawing templates are pre-made drawings that contain all of the standard settings for your company, such as layers, text styles, dimension styles, and linetypes. By using a drawing template, you can ensure that all of your drawings start with the same consistent settings.

    AutoCAD also includes a number of pre-configured standards, such as the National CAD Standard (NCS). These standards can be a good starting point for creating your own company standards.

    Here are some additional tips for creating and managing CAD standards:
    - Involve all stakeholders. When creating CAD standards, it is important to involve all of the people who will be using them, such as engineers, designers, and drafters. This will help ensure that the standards are realistic and easy to follow.
    - Document your standards. Once you have created your CAD standards, it is important to document them clearly and concisely. This will help ensure that everyone understands the standards and follows them consistently.
    - Update your standards regularly. As technology changes and your company's needs evolve, it is important to update your CAD standards accordingly. This will help ensure that your standards are always up-to-date and effective.

    I hope this information is helpful. Please let me know if you have any other questions.

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