Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: XRef or Underlay Drafting View in 3d Model?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    2006-04
    Posts
    3
    Login to Give a bone
    0

    Default XRef or Underlay Drafting View in 3d Model?

    Is there a way to underlay, link or otherwise reference a Drafting View in the 3d model?

    We have a library of standard details that are saved as Drafting Views.

    It would be good to be able to Xref them into the model for coordination and/or checking purposes.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator david_peterson's Avatar
    Join Date
    2002-09
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    5,588
    Login to Give a bone
    0

    Default Re: XRef or Underlay Drafting View in 3d Model?

    You can use the insert view from file tool to get the Drafting views from a "Warehouse" library into a project model if that's what you're looking to do.
    I don't think you can insert annotation objects into a 3d view (other than Scope boxes, section boxes and now levels in 2019) but you could place the 3d view on a sheet and placing the drafting view on the same sheet.
    I'm not 100% sure if I answered your question, but those are the things I'm thinking of.
    Dave Peterson
    BIM Coordinator

    Acad - 2016 - Revit 2019 w/ A360 - Navisworks - 3ds 2019 - Ensacpe - Lumion - Win 7 64 - i7-6700K 4.0GHz 32GB DDR4 Ram - Nvidia Quadro K2200
    "The more you know, the less you know, because the more you know you don't know". --M. Lin

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    2006-04
    Posts
    3
    Login to Give a bone
    0

    Default Re: XRef or Underlay Drafting View in 3d Model?

    Many thanks! I think what you are saying is that you will need to generate a Sheet, and place / overlay the Drafting and 3d Live Views there.

    But, can the sheet view be imported or otherwise made visible in the 3d model? I know that the 3d elements cut in the 3d Live View can be manipulated there.

    Example, I have a section cut through the facade perimeter. I would usually design the cladding panels / brick courses in 2d. When I am satisfied, I would need to adjust the 3d elements to suit. Here is when it would be great to be able to make the 2d section geometry in the 3d model so that I can snap to them when updating the 3d elements.

    3d Objects like windows and doors will not have all the detail, which most manufacturers would provide 2d dwgs for. I would normally over this information and update the relevant 3/2d elements.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator david_peterson's Avatar
    Join Date
    2002-09
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    5,588
    Login to Give a bone
    0

    Default Re: XRef or Underlay Drafting View in 3d Model?

    There's another option of embedding those detail components in the model geometry. I've done that on projects before. Place detail components in the modeled family in the view where you want to see all that detail.

    Example would be curtain wall mullions. You can't really create a profile for a mullion that includes all the cold joints and gaskets and screws and such. (I would argue that since in the US, this is typically done as a performance based spec, you really shouldn't be putting any of that information in the detail anyway as how that is put together is dependent upon the manufacturer and is really their responsibility) You can create a detail component family and nest that in the mullion profile. When you cut the mullion, you'll see all that detail. You can also set that to a specified detail level so it won't show up at course or medium. Is that what you're trying to do?

    On the other question, yes you can import full sheets of drafting views in to a project. We've got several sheets set up that way for typicals that we use on every project. My suggestion to our users is use revit for what it's good at. Drafting views are great because you can use them on many projects and just need to provide small tweaks. Nesting the detail elements in the modeled elements is difficult, but provides a high level of coordination between the detail and the model. That's kind of the 2 ways you can do things. Revit is great a blocking out basic outlines for where items go. From there I'd say it's up to you to decide if you want your details based on Modeled elements or drafting views. I had one team member that would always draw all the details for the exterior and give them to the team and tell them to match the model to the details. I have another team member that does the opposite and matches the details to the model. I have a 3rd team member that embeds all the detail information into the modeled elements.
    In the first example, that team member works on building that are usually more simplistic in nature, with limited systems and he'd draw the details based on those systems and offsets from the slab edges. He'd been detailing building exteriors for 35+yrs and just knows where everything needs to go. So the designed would tell him what he wanted and give him the basic concept, he would then tell the designer what he was going to get. Then draw all the typical details for the systems and system transitions, give them to the project team and say make the model match the details. He'd spend about 2 weeks creating drafting views for the project and then provides assistance for any unique conditions. Details were typical in nature and would generally show offsets from slab edges and dimensions for systems. Those drafting views could then be utilized on other projects by simply importing them.
    In the 2nd case, the team member was really good at modeling stuff in Revit. So they modeled what they want and where they wanted it. Cut the section, hide the 3d modeled elements and use detail components in the view to create the detail. When the modeled elements would shift, you would need to go thru the views and turn the modeled stuff back on and adjust all the 2d detail elements. At the end of the project all you had were modeled families and 2d components. You could copy and paste the 2d stuff from model to model and insert the modeled families, but that was about it. No option to easily transfer details from one project to another.
    In the 3rd case, this individual was playing the part of Assistant Designer and Project Architect. They were taking direction from the Designer and developing the model. We started with basic components, modeling all the exterior elements and leaving blanks where we didn't know what we were doing. In many cases we were using in-place sweeps created with profile families to fill the gap at system transitions. As the model developed during CD's we started to create detail components and nest those into the sweep profiles and other modeled families used on the exterior. When we were done, you could cut a section anywhere in the building and the section was already detailed. All you really needed to do was add some annotation and dimensions. When things needed to be adjusted you adjusted the model and those nested detail components and you were done. Change it once and you're done. Worked great. Just super complicated and required a Revit user that was rather experienced and detail orientated. When the project was complete we had tons of detail families and modeled families that just needed to be tweaked for the next project. We were able to save those into a Warehouse file that we can use going forward to pull system components into the next project.

    Unless you're doing As-Built drawings, those manufacturers details really aren't required in my mind. What you need is something that represents the size and location of the item to be provided. But again, that's just my 2 cents.
    Not sure if this helps or answers your question, but that's the 3 methods I've seen used on projects.
    Dave Peterson
    BIM Coordinator

    Acad - 2016 - Revit 2019 w/ A360 - Navisworks - 3ds 2019 - Ensacpe - Lumion - Win 7 64 - i7-6700K 4.0GHz 32GB DDR4 Ram - Nvidia Quadro K2200
    "The more you know, the less you know, because the more you know you don't know". --M. Lin

Similar Threads

  1. 2010: Copy a section view from the model to a drafting view.
    By Giorgos82 in forum Revit Structure - General
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2013-03-18, 02:14 PM
  2. 2012: Underlay RCP and Underlay Orientation
    By SamuelAB in forum Revit Architecture - General
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2012-08-08, 05:27 PM
  3. Ability to "flatten" a model view into a drafting view.
    By Revit Wishes in forum Revit Architecture - Wish List
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 2009-09-06, 06:21 AM
  4. Model view to drafting view
    By miwalker in forum Revit Architecture - General
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 2009-07-16, 12:50 PM
  5. 2008 SCALE 1:100 xref xref xref xref- scale list issues
    By Apsis0215 in forum AutoCAD Customization
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2008-11-21, 08:17 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •