Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Cost Analysis for Management

  1. #1
    Design Visualization Moderator stusic's Avatar
    Join Date
    2004-10
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    1,515
    Login to Give a bone
    0

    Question Cost Analysis for Management

    Hello everyone,

    I've been looking at the way our office operates concerning the software we use and looking into other options that could possibly save money and increase productivity. I'd like to get some input on my idea to see if it's feasible and reaslistic.

    First, I'd like to give you some background on our office:

    We are an AEC firm based in Macon, Georgia. We have our our engineering (MEP) designing done here and our architectural office is in Atlanta. We also have a small remote office in Brunswick that deals with industrial only. Our architectural office has begun to use ADT, although it's slow-going, and our industrial office in Brunswick is for all intents and purposes a separate entity, dealing in a very specific area, for only one client. Our main office in Macon is the office I'm mostly concerned about and the office where I think the implementation of my plan would be most beneficial.
    All Autodesk seats we hold are plain, vanilla AutoCAD working on the subscription service. Although the vast majority of us don't use any of the 3D aspects included with full-blown AutoCAD, the drafters do use things that aren't included with LT, like LISP routines and ARX applications. This has been the basis for the choice to use full AutoCAD instead of LT.
    Of the 25-odd seats we hold, only 9 of them are for drafters; the rest are for engineers and designers, and the occassional use by our marketing department.

    It is my idea that if we move the drafters to ABS, which seems to be designed specifically for firms like ours, after a small learning curve (they already know AutoCAD, the base platform for ABS), our productivity would be substantially increased and coordination issues would be easily identified and quickly resolved.
    To compensate for the increased cost of the ABS software, I think we should move all the engineers and designers, who only use AutoCAD to markup and review drawings, to AutoCAD LT. They don't need all the functionality of AutoCAD, but they would still be able to open, markup, plot, save, etc. as they do now. No significant change to their review/markup process.

    There are other details which I haven't included in this preliminary question, but this is the basic idea:
    Our drafters do mechanical, electrical and plumbing. The ABS software is designed for mechanical, electrical and plumbing. It makes sense. There's no need for us to be spending money on software that does much more than our engineers need to do; that money could be applied to software that would make our drafters much more productive. I think by cutting out the added cost of the seats our engineers have, it would make up the difference in the new software and a few new computers. The owners aren't interested in change, because they associate change with spending money. If I can show that by giving software that's appropriate for each position, they can save money and raise productivity, they may just go for it.

    Question 1:
    Does this sound like a realistic idea?

    Question 2:
    How do you think I should go about creating and presenting this cost analysis?

    Thank for any help and advice,

  2. #2
    Certified AUGI Addict cadtag's Avatar
    Join Date
    2000-12
    Location
    Cairo - no, not Illinois
    Posts
    5,070
    Login to Give a bone
    0

    Default Re: Cost Analysis for Management

    If the non-drafters are going to _only_ review, markup, print, then I would think it would be more effective to use the DWF based Design Review tools from Adesk instead of LT or vanilla Acad.

    Reason A is to protect your ABS design files from people who don't understand what ABS is doing or how to manipulate the ABS objects (I'm not even sure that LT can _DO_ anything with ADT or ABS objects!). It will ruin your day if an engineer explodes all your intelligent entities because he wanted to make a trivial change n appearance and plot it out. With DWF - he can't and your data/drawings are safer.

    Reason B is to speed the review/markup process up by keeping it electronic. You'll also be able to maintain and Audit trail of red-line files for when something gets fubared down the road. With Design Review, you can import the red lines into Acad and view them while you work on the drawing -- that's got to be faster than old-school.

    And finally, If you don't have all your Acad licenses on a license server, do it. that way it's easier to give access to ABS for the people that always need it, and practical to to give access to ABS for people who sometimes need it. You'll add up-front costs for the Design Review, but save in the long run by needing fewer seats of Acad/ABS.

    cheers

  3. #3
    Design Visualization Moderator stusic's Avatar
    Join Date
    2004-10
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    1,515
    Login to Give a bone
    0

    Default Re: Cost Analysis for Management

    Thanks, I'm looking into that right now

Similar Threads

  1. CR430-2: Best Practices for Real-Time Cost Management in Autodesk® Constructware®
    By Autodesk University in forum Construction and Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2015-08-07, 05:21 PM
  2. PM21-3: Using Cost Management to Drive Performance: A PJ Dick Case Study
    By Autodesk University in forum Project Management
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2013-04-17, 04:43 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2013-04-08, 07:56 PM
  4. Revit & Life Cycle Cost Analysis
    By jsteinhauer in forum Revit Architecture - General
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2011-10-27, 02:45 PM
  5. Cost Analysis
    By nsinha73 in forum Revit Architecture - General
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 2007-05-30, 10:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •